Search f11

Search the f11 site...

Use the search form below to search the f11 site. Enter your search term and press enter on your keyboard.

Sign In

My Account at f11 Photography Magazine

Welcome to your "My Account" area. From here you can access and update your contact and membership details, view all orders including videos and workshops purchased and write reviews on items you've bought.

Sign In

Please enter your username and password to log in.

Username:
Password:
 

If you have forgotten your login details and need a reminder, click here:
Request Reminder

Photography Magazine

Composition Tutorial

Proof in the Pudding


I knew then and there that it would be a strong image. Now, 6 months later, I can judge it objectively and the assessment stands: it’s a picture that gives me great satisfaction, and I think it will be one of those that stand the test of time. Being as it was, shot on the very last day of our Burma adventure, it pretty much sums up the whole trip, one of the best of recent years. Yet beyond that, it’s an image that in a nutshell defines how I work; the proof in the pudding that all we’ve been talking about in these Composition Tutorials works. Inspiration spawned an idea, which I translated into reality via the process of previsualization, planning and waiting for the Decisive Moment. After a month of shooting every day I was on a roll, seeing and working well, making pictures happen. It’s a happy place to be as a photographer; it’s a pity it can’t continue forever.

We’d been to Shwedagon at the start of the trip, so I knew the location. An idea of how I could use the strong shapes of the golden spires and the patterns in the marble paving lit by the early morning light had formed. However, I knew for the shot to be lifted beyond a mildly pleasing architectural study I would need some random human element; quite what that would be was in the Lap of the Gods. More monks were always an option in Burma, but I was a touch ‘monked out’ after a month of shooting orange robes. I resolved to set up the tripod in the soft light of dawn with my precise composition all framed up and just wait to see who would walk through my frame. It’s a way of working that often produces magic in Asia.

Sign In or Join F11 to read this article

Please enter your username and password to log in.

Username:
Password:
 

If you have forgotten your login details and need a reminder, click here:
Request Reminder